Critique

Critique – This Writer’s Way of Saying, “Dude, take it for a test drive before signing on the dotted line.”

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The continued conversation about critique from the other half… “Seriously, take your ‘potential’ critique partner/group out for a test drive.”

You know that feeling you get when you leave a conference, or your local chapter meeting, and you’re all jazzed up. You met some pretty freaking fantastic people and you think, “Wow, I need and critique partner and she’d be perfect?”

Sleep with her first.

KIDDING!

But you know what I mean, I hope.

One thing you’ll find out very quickly while reading this blog is that Casey is the funny one. I’m the serious one. Not that I can’t be funny (if you find the above is laughable), or she can’t be serious, but we approach things from different perspectives and for us that is a very good thing.

And we test drove each other (it did include being roommates and having to share a bed), but more importantly, we did not jump into a critique relationship right off the bat not knowing each other and expressing what our career goals are, how we approach the business, and a whole lot of other things. I mean, when I buy a car, I want to make sure it has the bells and whistles I want and need, not the bells and whistles someone wants to sell me.

Casey said some really fantastic things in her blog, and I agree with every single one (I’ll warn you, that doesn’t happen all the time, and again, that’s good).

I think the two most important things she mentioned are that your critique partner needs to check their ego at the door (and so do you) and secondly, critique partners need to care about each other’s success. We need to raise each other up, while we shred each other’s work.

The only goal in critiquing is to help the author make THEIR book better.

Here are my hard and fast rules.

  1. Don’t jump in with two feet. I’ve done this before, and it was disastrous. It’s like meeting someone and moving in three days later thinking I know enough about that them to spend all of my time with them.

While you’re in your dating phase, talk about goals and expectations. Listen to what your critique partner wants and needs. Express what you want and need. Discuss past critique relationships and why they worked and didn’t. I would also suggest that you at least take a peek under the hood, as in READ some of your potential new partner’s work.

  1. Be honest (without being cruel) – if you can’t tell your critique partner something isn’t working, then what is the point of being critique partners? My role is to find things that are either missing, don’t fit with the character or plot, or are dropping down a rabbit hole that is a dead end. This might not be the best example, but it shows my honesty.

But remember when being honest, to be real in why you feel the way you do and understand you maybe projecting personal opinion.

  1. Do project your personal opinion – remember, that it is an opinion and just because it bugs you, doesn’t mean it will bother anyone else. So remember there is a difference between critiquing story, and expressing a feeling. BUT both are important because again, the goal is to make the book better. So go back up to my first rule: BE HONEST.

I like this example that I sent to Casey because really, I went right to my weird obsession with Hannibal Lecter, but even this whacko has a limit, and for me, that just jolted me right out of the story.

Here is an example of where Casey did something similar in mine. I’ll be honest, I kept the reference to the hero’s use of weed when he was 17 in the story for a lot of reasons. She shared her opinion and feelings, and I did hear her, thought about it, and thought this is really part of his journey. It’s part of who he was back then.

 

  1. Never expect your critique partner to agree with your corrections or suggestions, much less use them.

This goes hand and hand with #3. Casey and I generally don’t go back and reread each other’s work to see what suggestions we made and if the other actually incorporated it. There have been times I’ve taken her sentence changes word for word, other times, just portions of them, and other times, I’ve gone in a completely different direction.

So, if your partner comes back to you and is upset because you ‘ignored’ them, it might be time reassess the relationship.

  1. Learn their choices and their voice. Casey and I do disagree on a few things and I’ve pointed out certain issues I have stylistic wise and she’s just like, “Yo, Jen, I’m not going to change this, EVER.” So, I have learned to step away. The example below is a good one.

 

I’m a stickler about speech tags. I’m also not a fan of flying body parts. So, something like: his eyes dropped to the floor, makes me nuts because that would hurt. Others may disagree, so in this case, I do stop commenting. It’s not my book. Well, sometimes I just have to say something and I’m sure Casey just goes, yep, NOPE. It’s all good!

  1. Ask questions. I always ask the writer questions in my critique. Now, I’m not looking for them to pick up the phone and call me and give me an answer. However, the author does have to have a good reason for what they doing. If they don’t, well, that’s a different story.

But I also ask questions because something popped into my head and I think it might be good for the story, or bad for the story.

  1. Share the love. I know Casey said this one, but it’s worth repeating. Why? Two reasons. One, we’re pointing out places that could be punched up, or potential issues with character or plot, but along the way, it’s always nice to know that something is positively perfection.

The second reason is sometimes I write something that I think is so freaking good, and it’s nice when Casey says, yep, you hit the sweet spot! (Often, she’s saying nope, that didn’t work, but hey, sometimes we have to kill our darlings.

  1. My final hard and fast rules… Re-evaluate your critique relationship.

As we grow and change as writers, so do our needs for critiquing. It doesn’t mean we need to change partners, it means we need to have a discussion with them about what we’re looking for. Sometimes I send Casey something to read and I ask for something specific, like, I’m concerned about how my heroine comes off, can you focus on that?

Every single time Casey sends me back a critique I get excited. I can’t wait to dive in and make my work better. That’s how a critique relationship should be.

Next up: Casey will be discussing how our specific critique relationship started and why, along with a few other tidbits. I’ll be adding on after she shows us her infinite wisdom!

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2 Comments

  • Casey Hagen

    Gah! Can anyone tell that Jen is way better at coming up with hard and fast rules than I am?

    I couldn’t agree more with her list and there are a few key points in there that are precisely why we work so well.

    Don’t just jump in! I’ve done it. And then I got stuck with someone with an ego the size of Texas. In the end it destroyed the friendship…but more about that Thursday!

    There are plenty of times I haven’t agreed with Jen, but it didn’t mean my way was right either. It meant that I missed the mark and because I did, she didn’t understand what I was trying to convey. It resulted in changes, but I went in a completely different direction. So, despite not agreeing, the advice was still brilliant because it highlighted where I had taken a wrong turn.

    Ask questions…LOL. I tend to be the one who sends and email, text, or makes a call to explain. Not all the time, but when it’s important. Sometimes it’s just terminology she’s never heard or I’ve never heard and we clarify. Not always a bad thing since it expands our personal vocabulary. Just be aware not everything needs to be a discussion.

    Re-evaluation is key! Make sure you tell your partner what you need from her as the relationship evolves. Make sure you still know what she needs from you!

    • Jen Talty

      I’m a rule person, aren’t I? LOL. But I do love our discussions. We each learn something new and we always work though it, together. Go back to Casey’s post…it’s a we program, lol.

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