Critique

The excitement of the new, bright shiny idea AND “What? No Boom Boom?”

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Before I get into the topic of today’s post. Here are some pictures of the Jupiter Writing retreat. We had lots of laughs and enjoyed the sites around my little town. I didn’t get enough writing done, which is okay, the laughter made it all worth it!

Casey talked about how she can’t stand writing first chapters. This is the one place she doesn’t sort of follow one of our rules about critiquing. IT’S A DRAFT.

I say this because she’s spending a lot of time making it PERFECT. Trust me when I say, she does not sweat like this when she does the other chapters. They come flying at me one right after the other. My theory on this is that she’s trying to get to know her characters and story better. Setting it all up nice and pretty.

Fuck pretty. I’m sitting here in my PJ’s writing this post. My hair looks worse than in the pictures above and I’ll stay that way all day!

First chapters for me are easy. They flow from my brain to my finger tips to the page in seconds. It’s exciting. It’s like driving your new car for the very first time. You want to check out all the features and when you pull out onto the street, your heart races and you have a smile plastered across your face. You love it so much you want to show it off. You take people for rides and you drive places and don’t need to be there.

I love first chapters. But I spend a lot of time with my people and I have an outline written out before I even sit down to write. I’ve taken the time to write my blurb and in my head, I know that climatic scene, so I know where I’m going. If I don’t have an ending in mind, then I will get lost and that often means I started the book in the wrong place.

The other thing is I generally like to start in action in the first chapter. That’s my thing. It’s my strength. Most of the time I have too much action, a lot of dialogue and NOTHING else, and I’m okay with that. I TRUST that Casey will point out the places I need to layer in all the good stuff. I also TRUST myself to do it because the first chapter is one of the last chapters I completely edit.

Why?

Because once I get to the end, some things have changed, so some things might need to be added to the first chapter, and also, I can see the nuggets I had might have edited out. For example, I had a character I introduced in a first chapter that I honestly thought, fuck, I have to take her out, she means nothing to the story. But oops, chapter ten there she is and she’s very important.

I have confidence in my first chapters mostly because I’m so freaking excited about the story that it shows in what I write and that’s a good thing. It might be a false confidence, but when I sit down to write a new story, I’m busting at the scenes.

Here’s the deal with my first chapters. I don’t read and reread looking to make sure I set it all up. I take the creative energy it generates and keep writing. I almost always write the first 10k of a story in a day or two. Then I pitter out a bit.

Because it’s not so new anymore. LOL.

And now, I’ve been told have to talk about sex…

I don’t hate writing sex scenes. But I do avoid them. I will go clean my son’s bathroom instead of writing a sex scene. You’d think because it is in part an action scene, I’d be good at it and enjoy it (yeah, don’t go there, this is FICTION not reality).

Ever watch the movie Overboard? One of my favorite lines is, “What, no boom boom?”

That’s what my characters say to me as they stare at me waiting for me to write their love making. Ugh.

I dread writing sex scenes, even though I use them to show emotional growth and change in a character, and let’s remember, they have to move the story forward. In my book, The Return Home, there is only one scene because that is all the story required. In Summer’s Gone, there isn’t a single one. Lots of attraction and some making out, but no sex and that is because of who the characters are, not because I don’t want to write them.

While I love language and swearing rolls off my tongue like honey dripping off a spoon, word choices bother in me sex scenes when I read them. Like the word Penis. Nope. Please don’t use it in a sex scene. I’m like, ewe. But I also don’t like writing the three C’s and they isn’t, church, cooking, or cleaning (go see Casey’s post if you can’t figure them out). While I write sort of graphic sex scenes, I try to focus on the emotion…BINGO that’s my problem.

Writing emotion, or showing emotion, is difficult for me. The Return Home was a very emotional book and not only did I cry writing it, but it took longer than I thought it would. There is no suspense and even though there is only one sex scene, the entire book is a big old puddle of emotions.

No one got murdered. No one turned into a Fairy. There was no high-speed car chase to break up the emotions that are so hard for me to get on the page.

So I avoid it.

But, one thing I always do when I go through a book for the second and third time, is I layer that emotion right in. I can do it when I’ve gotten everything else down on the page, so to write an emotional scene is like, fuck, do I have to?

I also write linearly. So, that means I HAVE to do it right then and not jump to the next scene. Why? Because it’s an emotional scene and it might reveal something about my characters I didn’t know.

Everyone has something they struggle with. What’s yours?

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